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who says you can’t have a relationship with a lamp? - 
These Adorable Solar Lights Follow You Around Like A Loyal Pet

The Wanderer

"In my errant life I roamed
To learn the secrets of women and men,
Of gods and dreams.
I’ve known all the countries of our world,
I’ve lived a thousand lives:
Many lives I lived in love, 
Other lives I squandered.
For in my life I never traveled, 
All I did was wander.”

The cure or the story? ~ by Seth Godin

The plumber, the roofer and the electrician sell us a cure. They come to our house, fix the problem, and leave.

The consultant, the doctor (often) and the politician sell us the narrative. They don’t always change things, but they give us a story, a way to think about what’s happening. Often, that story helps us fix our problems on our own.

The best parents, of course, are in the story business. Teachers and bosses, too.

Rethinking What We Mean by ‘Mobile Web’

Chris Dixon, in a piece titled “The Decline of the Mobile Web”, citing stats from ComScore and Flurry:

People are spending more time on mobile vs desktop. And more of their mobile time using apps, not the web.

This is a worrisome trend for the web. Mobile is the future. What wins mobile, wins the Internet. Right now, apps are winning and the web is losing.

I think Dixon has it all wrong. We shouldn’t think of the “web” as only what renders inside a web browser. The web is HTTP, and the open Internet. What exactly are people doing with these mobile apps? Largely, using the same services, which, on the desktop, they use in a web browser. Plus, on mobile, the difference between “apps” and “the web” is easily conflated. When I’m using Tweetbot, for example, much of my time in the app is spent reading web pages rendered in a web browser. Surely that’s true of mobile Facebook users, as well. What should that count as, “app” or “web”?

I publish a website, but tens of thousands of my most loyal readers consume it using RSS apps. What should they count as, “app” or “web”?

I say: who cares? It’s all the web.

We shouldn’t think of “the web” as only what renders in web browsers. We should think of the web as anything transmitted using HTTP and HTTPS. Apps and websites are peers, not competitors. They’re all just clients to the same services.

Dixon concludes:

Apps are heavily controlled by the dominant app stores owners, Apple and Google. Google and Apple control what apps are allowed to exist, how apps are built, what apps get promoted, and charge a 30% tax on revenues.

Most worrisome: they reject entire classes of apps without stated reasons or allowing for recourse (e.g. Apple has rejected all apps related to Bitcoin). The open architecture of the web led to an incredible era of experimentation. Many startups are controversial when they are first founded. What if AOL or some other central gatekeeper had controlled the web, and developers had to ask permission to create Google, YouTube, eBay, Paypal, Wikipedia, Twitter, Facebook, etc. Sadly, this is where we’re headed on mobile.

Yes, Apple and Google (and Amazon, and Microsoft) control their respective app stores. But the difference from Dixon’s AOL analogy is that they don’t control the internet — and they don’t control each other. Apple doesn’t want cool new apps launching Android-only, and it surely bothers Google that so many cool new apps launch iOS-first. Apple’s stance on Bitcoin hasn’t exactly kept Bitcoin from growing explosively. App Stores are walled gardens, but the apps themselves are just clients to the open web/internet.1

The new mobile app-centric order hasn’t been a problem for Instagram, WhatsApp, Vine, Secret, or dozens of other new companies. In fact, I don’t think many of them would have even existed in a world still centered on HTML/CSS/JavaScript rendered in a browser. Instagram needed the camera, and thrived by providing scrolling performance unmatched by anything I’ve ever seen in a mobile web browser — even today, let alone when Instagram debuted in 2010. How could messaging apps like WhatsApp and Line even exist in a browser-only world?

Read Full Article:  HERE

Live in the now and make brief visits to the past and the future when it is appropriate. It’s important to visualize and expect a bright future. In fact it is critical. But if you dwell on the future too much, you will be unhappy and unfulfilled because you will never actually get there. The future by definition does not exist. It is the future. It’s a moving target, always out of your reach. It really doesn’t exist.
Effective delegation takes some understanding of a few things:

Unlock the Potential of Others

Leaders cannot do it alone. My God that couldn’t be more true. The single greatest skill I’ve picked up this year is that of effective delegation. Effective delegation takes some understanding of a few things:

1.) Who is hungry for responsibility
2.) What makes them tick
3.) Relevant skills to leverage
4.) Setting realistic (read: REALISTIC and not LOW) expectations for quality and speed
5.) Trust

Simply put, you need to understand your people. You need to know how much bandwidth they have at a given time to accomplish something, whether they have either a.) the desire to complete a project in a given area, b.) the relevant skills necessary or most ideally c.) all three.

Once you decide who can and would want to take a project on, set realistic but high expectations. Be very up front about the date a deliverable is due and the quality expected. Breed an expectation of excellence, but give a fair amount of time and most importantly TRUST the individual to get it done. Do not micromanage. This will keep your team engaged and feeling fulfilled.

 Complete article [Here]

There was another life that I might have had, but I am having this one.
Kazuo Ishiguro  (via tobia)

The company most likely to kill native apps is Apple

— Benedict Evans (@BenedictEvans)

March 18, 2014

Confessions of an ex-tech journalist

No self-respecting reporter prefers to interact with a PR person over the story’s subject or an original source. PR people get in the way of stories more often than they enable them, in my experience. They unnecessarily staff interviews so they can bill more hours and seem to think it unreasonable that a journalist would want to talk to a source without a patrol present.

I understand that for many startup founders, crafting a pitch and media outreach is beyond their skill set and/or they don’t have time, which is why they hire a firm. However, a common misconception is that you need a PR firm to get coverage. Entrepreneurs would trepidatiously inquire all the time whether they were “allowed” to email me directly. Of course you can, and please do.

WEEKEND READ: I’m reading Ben Horowitz book that was published this month. I highly recommend it for all entrepreneurs and startup CEOs. Ben shares insightful practical wisdom and anecdotes from his own experience founding, running, selling, buying, managing, and investing in tech companies. There is no better person to say the things he says. [The Hard Thing About Hard Things Is MUST READ]

WEEKEND READ: I’m reading Ben Horowitz book that was published this month. I highly recommend it for all entrepreneurs and startup CEOs. Ben shares insightful practical wisdom and anecdotes from his own experience founding, running, selling, buying, managing, and investing in tech companies. There is no better person to say the things he says. 

[The Hard Thing About Hard Things Is MUST READ]